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January 2019

Reasons Why Students Are Leaving The Faith – Part 1

Barna Group has done research and revealed reasons why young people are leaving the Church. The reasons they listed were:

  1. Isolationism
  2. Shallowness
  3. Anti-science
  4. Sex
  5. Exclusivity
  6. Doubters

In this episode I go through the first three reasons and shares personal stories of how students are struggling with isolationism, shallowness, and anti-scientific claims. I then list a few ways in which we can address these issues with our students.

Have you had any students list any of these reasons for why they are struggling with their faith?

You can follow the Coffeehouse Questions Podcast and have it automatically downloaded to your device by subscribing on iTunes. If you don’t have iTunes, find the podcast and follow on SoundCloud or search “Coffeehouse Questions with Ryan Pauly” on your Android podcast player. Finally, if you’d rather stick to the radio, you can listen to the show on 100.1 KGBA every Saturday night from 9-9:30 PT.

Like the Facebook page or follow on Instagram to interact with Ryan and his guests on future shows. Your questions and comments help to make the show more interactive. So, send in those questions at contact@coffeehousequestions.com, FacebookTwitterInstagram, or by text at (714) 989-6927 (Google Voice number for texts only).

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If we know that there’s Heaven, why do we still fear death?

Check out this short answer during an open Q&A with a group of junior high students.

Why do you think someone would fear death? Comment below!

If you are interested in having me speak at your church, camp, or youth group, click on the Endorsements & Speaking page to see my list of topics. Then, contact me at Speaking Requests or email me at contact@coffeehousequestions.com. You can select a topic from the list or suggest your own. I am happy to help in any way I can. God bless!

How can we think critically about entertainment?

I finished off 2018 by discussing a recent talk I gave to a high school youth group about how entertainment can brainwash us. However, I wasn’t able to finish my thoughts in that episode and get to the part about how we can think critically about entertainment. This is the aspect that many of us need to focus on. We sometimes either don’t think about entertainment at all and are led astray by it, or we boycott it completely. We draw a hard line in the sand between good and bad and say away from any songs, movies, or TV shows that have “bad” things in them.

I want to present another option. I want to suggest continuing to watch movies and listen to music, within reason, but do so while thinking deeply about the information entering our minds. We should watch movies as a family and discuss them with our students. Some questions you should ask when watching movies or TV are:

  • What worldview is the movie communicating?
  • What do they want me to do/think?
  • Who are the good guys? Who are the villains?
  • What is the good life according to the movie?

These questions, and others, can keep you from falling captive to false ideas. Check out this week’s episode to hear how I thought about a recent movie and other ways that we can think critically about entertainment.

Do you take a break from technology or think critically about movies? Comment below with steps you take or questions you ask in order to think critically about entertainment.

You can follow the Coffeehouse Questions Podcast and have it automatically downloaded to your device by subscribing on iTunes. If you don’t have iTunes, find the podcast and follow on SoundCloud or search “Coffeehouse Questions with Ryan Pauly” on your Android podcast player. Finally, if you’d rather stick to the radio, you can listen to the show on 100.1 KGBA every Saturday night from 9-9:30 PT.

Like the Facebook page or follow on Instagram to interact with Ryan and his guests on future shows. Your questions and comments help to make the show more interactive. So, send in those questions at contact@coffeehousequestions.com, FacebookTwitterInstagram, or by text at (714) 989-6927 (Google Voice number for texts only).

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